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Elk Species Facts and Information

Rocky Mountain Elk

Rocky Mountain Elk
The Rocky Mountain Elk, also known as American Elk or Wapiti, is grayish-brown in color with a yellowish-tan rump and a darker brown mane from the upper shoulder to the lower chest. The male elk (also called bull) has been known to weigh as much as 1,000 pounds (450 kg), while the female elk (called cow) will usually weigh approximately 500 pounds (225 kg). A mature bull elk stands about 5 feet (150 cm) at the shoulder and will usually have antlers that are 5 points or better on each side.

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Roosevelt Elk

Roosevelt Elk
The Roosevelt Elk, also known as Olympic Elk or Wapiti, are the largest of the elk subspecies. Mature elk can weigh anywhere from 600 to 1,100 pounds (275 to 500kg) when mature, with a height at the shoulder up to 5 feet (150 cm). The Roosevelt Elk tend to be a deeper darker brown than the relatively smaller Rocky Mountain Elk, and have a darker mane and yellowish-brown rump. Roosevelt Elk tend to have narrower antlers than the Rocky Mountain elk, but usually have much more mass and height. The average length of a Roosevelt Elk is 8 feet, but mature bull elk have also been measured up to 10 feet.

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Tule Elk

Tule Elk
The Tule Elk is the smallest of the North American elk species, the male (bull) elk weighing an average of 450 to 500 pounds (200 to 225 kg), and the female (cow) weighing between 350 to 425 pounds (150 to 200 kg). Tule Elk have a light-beige coat with a dark brown mane surrounding their neck. The rump of the Tule elk is white to a very light tan. The average length of a Tule Elk is 7 feet, and is 4 to 5 feet high at the shoulders. Similar to the Rocky Mountain Elk, a mature male Tule Elk will typically have 6 points on each of the antlers.

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